Show Your Work

The AHA calendar is the place to go on our web site for various fellowship, research, and seminar opportunities from history-friendly organizations. Let’s take a look at abridged versions of the calls for papers on the calendar with submission deadlines before the end of the academic year. Get out those laptops and start writing!

  • Call for abstracts for the international & interdisciplinary conference, “Human Rights, Individualism & Globalization,” to be held April 10-12, 2008, at Bethany College in West Virginia. Suggested topics can be found here. 150-word abstracts should be e-mailed to HumanRightsProposal@ideologiesofwar.com before February 29, 2008. Additional information about the conference can be found online.
  • Call for papers for the “Beyond Imagined Uniqueness: Nationalisms in Comparative Perspective” conference to be held at the American Studies Center, University of Warsaw, May 19-21, 2008. The aim of the conference is to provide a space for an interdisciplinary and international conversation about nationalism. Theoretical perspectives, as well as case studies from various locations and fields—including sociology, politics, media studies, literature and the arts—are welcome. Original papers concerning both the history of nationalism(s) and its various present manifestations are welcome. Deadline for submission of abstracts (up to 500 words) is February 29, 2008. Proposals will be considered as they arrive with final notification of acceptance by March 15. Proposals should be sent to William R. Glass.
  • Call for submissions for sessions, roundtable discussions, and individual papers on all aspects of urban history for the 4th biennial Urban History Association conference, “Shock Cities: Urban Form in Historical Perspective,” to be held in Houston, Texas, on November 5-8, 2008. Submissions that focus on questions of rapid urban growth, urban form, and their consequences across time and also from a transnational perspective are encouraged. While “shock cities” has been a phrase associated with dominating modern cities with social hierarchy, diverse economies, and political or governmental crises, it need not be so restricted. The phrase evokes an array of urban issues in many places and in many eras, such as demographics, governance, economy, and physical form. Final submissions are due March 3, 2008, and should be sent via e-mail to the program chair, Martin Melosi, and Janet R. Bednarek. Panel and roundtable proposals should designate a single point-of-contact and include a brief explanation of the overall theme as well as one-page abstracts of each paper (panels only) and one-page c.v.’s for each participant. Those submitting an individual paper, please include a one-page abstract and a one-page c.v. While individual paper submissions will be considered, preference will be given to complete panels.
  • Call for papers for a conference that seeks to re-open dialogue on the epochal “Black Athena.” The questions “Black Athena” has raised are perhaps more urgent and pressing today than at any other time: Can a myth of Afrocentrism ever be a useful narrative in contemporary culture? How do Africanizing and classicizing cultures interface and interpenetrate in the arts and lives of Africans, Europeans, Caribbeans, and Americans? Does “Black Athena” offer new possibilities for comparison between African, Jewish, and Islamic diasporas, cultures, and struggles? Send proposals of up to 500 words for papers by March 31, 2008, to Daniel Orrells, Dept. of Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK. E-mail: D.Orrells@warwick.ac.uk.
  • Call for papers for a conference on “Global Encounters: Legacies of Exchange and Conflict (1000-1700),” organized by the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Conference dates: November 14-15, 2008. Papers dealing with cultural mediation, interchange, and conflict are especially welcome. Possible areas of geographical concentration include Europe, the Atlantic world, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Proposals should include a title, a 250 word abstract, a two-page maximum c.v., and full contact information. Submit to the MEMS Organizing Committee, c/o Prof. Brett Whalen. Proposals are due April 1.
  • Call for papers for the National Coalition of Independent Scholars 2008 Biennial Conference to be held October 24-26, 2008, at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. Participation by all scholars whose research is not supported by employment in an academic or research institution is welcomed; this includes adjunct faculty and graduate students. NCIS invites proposals for individual papers, formal sessions, and short panel discussions. Send an abstract of not more than 250 words, a brief biography, audio-visual requirements, and contact information as an e-mail attachment no later than April 1, 2008, to Kendra Leonard. Please use your last name as the document title, as in Smith.doc. For further information, visit the NCIS web site.
  • The Association for the Study of Connecticut History invites proposals for presentations at its annual fall meeting (“East and West of the River: A Comparative Approach”) to be held at the Avery Point campus of the University of Connecticut on November 1, 2008. While the program as a whole seeks to highlight comparisons and contrasts between the regions east and west of the Connecticut River, individual presentations may focus on subjects linked to one side of the river or the other. The Connecticut River has served both to unite and to divide the colony and state since the arrival of the English. The conference will take a comparative view of developments in Connecticut on both sides of the river. Themes addressed may include settlements and land distribution, church and government, revivalism and political dissent, industrialization and mechanization, reform and suffrage, literature and visual arts, and comparative biography. Academics, archivists, independent historians, librarians, and museum professionals are invited to submit proposals that could take the form of scholarly papers, illustrated talks, or non-traditional public history approaches. Those interested in participating in the program should contact, by May 1, program chair Guocun Yang, Social Sciences Dept., Manchester Community College, Great Path M.S. #4, P.O. Box 1046, Manchester, CT 06045-1046. (860) 512-2782. E-mail: gyang@mcc.commnet.edu.
  • The American Journalism Historians Association invites paper entries, panel proposals, and abstracts of research in progress on any facet of media history for its annual convention, October 2-4, 2008, in Seattle. All submissions must have been postmarked by May 15, 2008. For details on research papers, panels, and research in progress, visit the AJHA web site.
  • Accompany Publishing, a K-12 curriculum publisher, seeks proposals from teachers, teaching-artists, and other practitioners. It is looking for unique and successful activities that teach core curriculum in an active and innovative way. It is looking for concepts that make learning experiential, creative, and engaging for an entire classroom. Prior publication credits are not necessary. Accompany Publishing is currently working with many teachers to transform their ideas into packaged product for distribution to K-12 teachers across the disciplines. Interested educators should send a proposal of no more than 300 words describing their work and specific activity/program/book ideas to Joey Madia, director of acquisitions and development, Accompany Publishing, 1170 15th Ave. SE, STE 305, Minneapolis, MN 55414-2595. E-mail: joey@accompanypublishing.com. Please include an e-mail address, as all proposals will be carefully considered and timely feedback provided.

To post an item on the calendar please use the online submission form

Back to Top

Leave a Reply

Comment

* Required field