What We’re Reading: April 24, 2008 Edition

Whether it’s the recent report about the future of the AHA or reoccurring issues at the Job Register, you can be sure there will be reactions and opinions on the blogosphere about it. We start off this week’s “What We’re Reading,” by linking to Jeremy Young at Progressive Historians and Sterling Fluharty at PhdinHistory for their takes (and requests for opinions) on the AHA. Also in this post we cover this year’s college grads and their job prospects, professional histories and history by professionals, teaching with YouTube, and grants for improved student learning. We finish up with links to an interview with Daniel Walker Howe, images from Hitler’s private gallery, a look at social networking and scholarship, and a “pirate problem”.

Opinions on the AHA

  • The AHA Should Aid Bloggers, Not Control Them
    Jeremy Young at Progressive Historians weighs in on the recent final report from the Working Group on the Future of the AHA, mentioned last week on AHA Today, offering a detailed and thoughtful analysis.
  • Let Your Voices Be Heard: A Survey about the AHA
    Sterling Fluharty of PhDinHistory has created an interesting, albeit lengthy, survey to ask how his readers feel about the AHA and its potential reforms. Though some questions replicate some of the more contentious views in the blogosphere about what the AHA does or does not do (i.e. “The AHA is so spineless that it does not want to police plagiarists in the profession”), it’s still a useful starting point for discussion. And with a substantive response, the results could be equally useful.
    Please Note: This survey is an independent project and is neither supported nor endorsed by the AHA, so while we will read the results with interest, we still hope you will also send comments to Robert Townsend.

Other Reads

Contributors: David Darlington, Debbie Ann Doyle, Noralee Frankel, Elisabeth Grant, and Robert Townsend

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