National History Center Revamps Website

The National History Center recently spruced up its web site with a sleeker, more streamlined look. A simpler navigation structure now leads visitors easily to information on the center’s programs, staff, founders and contributors, and more. Keep up to date on NHC news and events by signing up for their new RSS feed or e-mail (find links for these on the homepage). Use the added search function to find what you’re looking for, and experience past events through the podcasts of lectures posted on the site.

Speaking of events, next up for the NHC is a congressional briefing on “A History of Radical Islam: Before and After 9/11”, which takes place this Friday, May 9 from 2-3:30 p.m. at the Rayburn building.

National History Center web site gets a new look

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  1. Larry Cebula

    Some of those “podcasts” are not properly podcasts at all, they are streaming video. You can’t download them and listen or watch on your iPod. (At least not without a hack.)

    On further review, some of these, the ones hosted at the Council on Foreign Relations website, can be downloaded as videos though not as MP3s. So they are batting 50%.

    I wish more humanities institutions presented their online resources in flexible formats. I don’t want to sit at my computer and watch a history lecture. The video element in most of these is superfluous and if I am at my computer I already have work to do! I like podcasts because I can download them onto a portable device and listen to them in my car, while walking, or when my wife is trying to tell me something.

    The right way to do this is to put the lecture online in down loadable files—with every lecture as both an MP3 and video files.

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  2. Miriam Hauss

    The podcasts of the congressional briefings and the history education policy conference are available for free on iTunes and can be downloaded.

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