Women and War Resources

Primary sources on Civil War Women from Duke UniversityAt this summer’s America in the Civil War Era, 1829–77: A History Institute for Teachers, sponsored by groups from the Foreign Policy Research Institute and Carthage College, participants explored a range of topics related to the Civil War (see all the presentations and related classroom lessons here online).

Jane E. Schultz, professor of English, American Studies, and Women’s Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, was one of the participants at this summer conference and discussed “Women and the Civil War.” Also, check out a previous, but related, article of hers, “Ten Common Myths about Women in the Civil War and How to Dispel Them.”

Women Working 1800-1930, from Harvard Schultz also took part in this year’s 14th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, by chairing the session “The Unfinished Business of Gendering War History,” and has since put together, with the help of Kristi Palmer, assistant librarian at IUPUI, an excellent selection of “Women and War Primary Digital Resources.” With their permission we present below links to a selection of free resources they recommend.

Women and War Primary Digital Resources

Free databases online

Other Websites

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  1. Tanya Roth

    The American Memory Project at LoC is good, but even better is the LoC Veterans History Project, which often includes digitized oral histories (or transcripts of them), photographs, etc. It has a database that allows you to search by gender, branch, conflict, and so on; most holdings are 20th century: http://www.loc.gov/vets/

    In addition, the Women’s Research and Education Institution has an entire section of their website devoted to military women, including a list of archives that offer materials about women in the military. While most are non-digital, Texas Tech has a Vietnam archive online that includes women’s oral history transcripts. For WREI’s resources, see http://www.wrei.org/MilitaryWomen.htm

    Moving away from primary sources, H-Net’s H-Minerva listserv, dedicated to women and war/women and the military is also an excellent reference.

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