“Getting Medieval” in the September Perspectives on History

September 2008 Perspectives on HistoryThe September issue of Perspectives on History is now online, and begins with AHA president Gabrielle Spiegel’s article on “Getting Medieval”: History and the Torture Memos. She notes the use of “neomedievalism” in political arguments since 9/11, and how this is problematic.

The 123rd Annual Meeting is just months away, and this issue contains articles to help you prepare. To gear up for New York, check out Sharon Tune’s To New York for the 123rd Annual Meeting and Daniel Walkowitz’s Welcome to New York. Start planning your trip by perusing the Tours Organized by the Local Arrangements Committee, or downloading the registration form and hotel information. Online registration begins this Monday, September 15. Just a reminder, this year annual meeting attendees must first complete the meeting registration process in order to make a hotel reservation at the AHA’s meeting rates.

If you’re part of a session at the meeting you’ll definitely want to check out the second part of Linda Kerber’s Conference Rules series: Everything you need to know about introducing speakers and running a panel discussion.

While we’re on the subject of meetings, preparations for the 2010 annual meeting have already begun. Check out the call for proposals, the 2010 theme (Oceans, Islands, and Continents), and the annual meeting guidelines.

But back to the present, and the latest news, read Robert Townsend’s The Status of Women and Minorities in the History Profession, 2008. Also meet the newest Jameson and NASA fellows, learn about a new British Scholar Society, and review the winners of this year’s National History Day. Lee White from the National Coalition for History presents his reports on the release of the Rosenberg trial grand jury records and the latest happenings in Washington.

The Masters at the Movies series continues with Michael Kammen’s review of the film Paper Clips.

Also, check out a number of articles in the Viewpoints, Research, Teaching, and Noteworthy sections of the magazine. And finally, In Memoriam recognizes the passing of four historians.

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