What We’re Reading: 123rd Annual Meeting Edition

For both those who missed the annual meeting and those who’d like to read a range of takes on it, we present a roundup of some blog posts and articles on various aspects of the event. If we’ve failed to link to someone who covered the meeting we apologize, please feel free to contribute more links in the comment section.

AHA Related

Newspapers
Inside Higher Ed
Articles from Inside Higher Ed covered topics of graduate coursework, the history job market, transnational history, and the Council’s resolution for the 2010 annual meeting.

Chronicle
Most of the Chronicle’s articles on the annual meeting focused on the history job market, but two of their blogs (their News Blog and Stan Katz’s section on the Brainstorm blog) tackled topics on the Bush administration, Gabrielle Spiegel’s presidential address, the future of the annual meeting, and the drama in the State Department’s Historical Advisory Committee.

Bloggers
Alas the staff of the AHA finds itself stretched thin during the annual meeting, inhibiting the amount of blogging we’d really like to do. Luckily a number of meeting attendees hit the blogosphere with their takes on sessions, events, and the annual meeting in general. Below, arranged in alphabetical order, are links to these blogs. If you feel we’ve missed anyone please let us know in the comments below.

Cliopatria

  • 2008 Cliopatria Awards – The 2008 Cliopatria Awards for History blogging were presented during the AHA Meeting. Find information on and links to all the winners online.

Historiann
Since Historiann couldn’t make it to New York she turned to her correspondents “Hotshot Harry” and “Classy Claude” for musings on the meeting. She also put together her own roundup of annual meeting blog posts, including linking to some whose profanity left them out of what AHA Today would consider professional discourse.

History-ing
Cameron Blevins of the History-ing blog brought a unique perspective to the annual meeting considering Cameron is 22 and attended the meeting with “no job interviews, no papers to present, no potential colleagues I need to glad-hand.”

HNN
Rick Shenkman, editor of HNN, reports on the meeting, links to articles and blog posts, and presents a number of videos from a Historians Against the War panel.

Kelly in Kansas
Kelly Woestman notes the sessions she attended, the panel she was a part of, and the people she met up with while at the annual meeting.

Legal History Blog
Mary L. Dudziak sums up the annual meeting session “Doing Transnational History.”

PhDinHistory
Sterling Fluharty looks back at this year’s annual meeting experience and also posts the paper that he presented at “The History Job Market: Opportunities, Problems, and Fixes” session. Also be sure to check out his twitter page for brief comments and observations about specific sessions and the annual meeting in general.

Progressive Historians
AndrewMc “rambles” (his own word) about the AHA annual meeting and Job Center (formerly the Job Register) and gets a response in the comment section.

Tenured Radical
Claire B. Potter spent most of her meeting interviewing job candidates in a hotel room, but did find time to blog a few observations (job market sessions are “making people unnecessarily hysterical”) and once she returned home wrote about the Council’s resolution for the 2010 meeting (and her take on how to react to the situation).

What Else We’re Reading
Believe it or not we did find time to read a few non-annual meeting related articles and posts. Check them out below.

Contributors: David Darlington, Elisabeth Grant, and Vernon Horn

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  1. Ralph E. Luker

    I am curious about why the AHA continues to promote Historians TV, when the only content it carries is commercials for agencies and departments that have paid to have their commercials on it. Would you watch a television channel that was all commericial and no programming?

    Reply