Perspectives on History – September 2010

Perspectives on History - September 2010The online version of the September issue of Perspectives on History is now available to AHA members (sign in to member services to gain full access). Nonmembers can preview a portion of each article during the first month of the issue’s release.  After one month, the content will be freely available to all. This online issue also marks the start of a commenting feature for members. See our recent blog post about numerous changes for Perspectives on History, both in its print and online forms.

In this Issue
New AHA Executive Director Jim Grossman contributes to the September issue with his article, “History in a Public Square,” in which he encourages historians to get out of their comfort zones and engage with public by talking about history. Read also the article “South Asia at the AHA–Then and Now” by AHA President Barbara D. Metcalf, and learn about the history and current status of the field of South Asian history in the AHA.

News
Two reports on the history profession top the news this month. First, Robert B. Townsend reports from the annual university press meeting in “Is There an E-book in Your Future?”  Then, John Dichtl and Debbie Ann Doyle breakdown the report, “Tenure, Promotion, and the Publicly Engaged Academic Historian,” evaluating public history in promotion and tenure proceedings.

In AHA news, read the letter the AHA Council sent to the Texas State Board of Education on May 18, 2010. Learn also about the latest recipients of the Jameson Fellowship and the NASA Fellowship. And check out the AHA Council decisions from their meeting in June.

Then, hear the latest from our affiliates. The National History Center is accepting applications for its sixth international summer seminar on decolonization. The National Coalition for History is leading organizations in calling for renewed support of the Teaching American History program. World historians have created a new Network of Global and World History Organizations (NOGWHISTO).  The National Science Foundation is calling for papers on future research.

Annual Meetings
The upcoming 125th Annual Meeting in Boston is just around the corner (January 6–9, 2011). Start preparing with Sharon K. Tune’s helpful guide to making travel arrangements. There are also links to the registration form (though you can register online later this month) and hotel information. Then, look farther into the future with the Call for Proposals for the 126th Annual Meeting in 2012. The theme for that meeting is Communities and Networks. See also the Annual Meeting guidelines for information on the goals and structure of the yearly conference. And read about the Coordinating Council for Women in History’s accomplishments and new goals.

More
Also in this issue, Marcus Rediker delves into “The Poetics of History from Below,” W. Fitzhugh Brundage continues the Masters at the Movies series with “Why I’ll Watch Oscar Micheaux’s Within Our Gates until I Wear It Out,” with an introduction by Robert Brent Toplin, and Sarah Maza and Elise Lipkowitz suggest what questions to ask on your way to tenure. And finally, the “In Memoriam” column notes the passing of five historians.

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  1. John Coakley

    If the picture of St.Botolph’s church, Boston, ENGLAND, for your cover story on the annual meeting in Massachusetts is somehow intentional, it would be good to say a word in explanation.

    Reply
  2. Elisabeth Grant, AHA Web Content Editor

    Thanks for your comment. You are correct, the cover image was erroneously presented as Boston, MA when it was in fact of Boston, England.

    We have posted the following statement on the index of the online version of the issue, and it will also be included in the October print issue:

    “As many keen-eyed readers have pointed out, the image on the cover of the September issue is not a view of Boston, Massachusetts, but of Boston in Lincolnshire, England. We cannot, alas, pretend that it was a deliberate visual pun. It was an error, even if it was a happy one that incidentally and serendipitously recalls the English town whose name, in fact, was given to the Massachusetts city where the AHA will be meeting in January 2011. Please note that the name of the artist, Albert Goodwin was also misspelled in the print edition. We regret the errors.”

    Reply