What We’re Reading: January 20, 2011 Edition

Today's Document appStart off today’s What We’re Reading post with the schedule for new National History Center talks, a proposed Virginia textbook bill, an iPhone and Android app from the National Archives, and a detailed look at the redesigned homepage of the Library of Congress. Then, we turn to university presses and digital books. Also read a number of articles under the broad theme of politics: political violence, presidential addresses, filibusters, and the Constitution. And finish up with articles on an assortment of topics as well as a second roundup of annual meeting related posts.

News

University Presses
JSTOR and Oxford University Press are making an important move into the dissemination and discovery of digital books, which could have important implications for historians as the economics of printed monographs become a growing challenge. See the following articles from Inside Higher Ed and The Chronicle for more:

Politics

  • Assassins and American History
    The New York Times asks, “Does political speech lead to acts of political violence?” and presents a debate between seven historians: Robert Dallek, Jill Lepore, Steven F. Hayward, Steven Mintz, Kevin Baker, Julian E. Zelizer, and Catherine McNicol Stock.
  • The Writing of John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address
    The National Archives notes the 50th anniversary of the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy by posting a short video that features footage from the inauguration along with Curator Stacey Bredhoff presenting documents from the JFK Presidential Library and Museum.
  • The Tyranny of Defense Inc.
    Andrew J. Bacevich, AHA member and professor at Boston Univ., has written an essay for The Atlantic on the 50th anniversary of President Eisenhower’s farewell address.  
  • The Commandments
    Jill Lepore writes about “The Constitution and its worshippers” in this New Yorker article.
  • The Senate filibuster: Time for a change
    Former AHA President Joyce Appleby weighs in on the uses and abuses of the Senate filibuster and calls for scholars and citizens to join a petition drive for reform.

More

125th Annual Meeting Coverage Continued
Last Thursday we presented a roundup of articles, blog posts, tweets, and videos on the 125th Annual Meeting. Here are a few more, including a number of reviews of The Conspirator, that we either missed or came out after our post went up:

Contributors: David Darlington, Elisabeth Grant, James Grossman, Vernon Horn, and Robert B. Townsend

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