What We’re Reading: June 6, 2013

Today’s What We’re Reading features a history of manners, summer tips for archiving and cleaning, the life of Charles Dickens in song, and much more.

History in the News

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Boston College Wins a Victory in Legal Fight Over Oral History Records

The latest in the ongoing litigation over the Belfast Project, an oral history collection that includes stories from alleged IRA figures.

Don’t Be Disgusting

The estimable Miss Manners comments on a book of etiquette from the Renaissance, and the history of manners generally.

Women’s History and the Digital Humanities

“In the new era of digital humanities, women need a seat at the table while it’s still being set, not after the main course has been served.”

Syria’s Lost Generation

Keith David Watenpaugh, author of Being Modern in the Middle East, meets with Syrian university students at a refugee camp and notes how little the middle class figures into images of who seeks refuge from violence: “Historically … Middle Eastern refugees can appear to be an undifferentiated, opaque mass in the collective consciousness of international humanitarianism.”

History Detectives Host’s Collection of Black Propaganda Posters Subject of Philly Exhibit

Tukufu Zuberi’s personal collection makes up Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

Historians in Summer

After you’ve read AHA Today’s Summer Tips for Visiting Archives, check out Michelle Tiedje’s “Surviving the Long Research Trip” and Sean Cosgrove’s “A Historian’s Guide to Summer—The Ice Cream Edition,” then dream of summer cleaning with Katherine O’Flaherty’s “Academic Clean Sweep.”

 

Fun and Off-beat

Here Is Charles Dickens as Morrissey

Horrible Histories offers the life of Charles Dickens in song.

A Disappearing American Original: The Roadside Rest Area

A photo essay on the great American landmarks you never noticed, from the Atlantic Cities.

Comic Book Religion

A database of the religious affiliations of 30,170 comic book characters. Yes, this is a thing.

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