Historians Awarded Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships

The American Council of Learned Societies recently announced the results of the 2013-14 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship competition. 64 fellowships were awarded to advanced graduate students, 26 of which are AHA Members* and historians. Fellows were selected from a highly competitive pool of nearly 1,000 applicants. Congratulations to all of the winners!ACLS_Logo

Joel Anderson, Cornell University
Imagining Universal Government at the Edge of the World: Institutional Forms in Norse Bishops’ Lives

Ben Breen*, University of Texas, Austin
Tropical Transplantations: Drugs, Nature, and Globalization in the Portuguese and British Empires, 1640-1750

Katie Ann-Marie Bugyis, University of Notre Dame
Ministers of Christ’s Word: Benedictine Women Religious in Early and Central Medieval England

Rowan Dorin*, Harvard University
Expulsions of Foreign Moneylenders in Medieval Europe, 1200-1450

Jeffrey Alan Erbig*, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Where Nomads and Mapmakers Meet: Rethinking Borderlands from the Río de la Plata, 1700-1805

Elisabeth Fink, New York University
Elections and the Politics of Mobilization: Voting in French West Africa, 1944-1960

Jonathan Gebhardt, Yale University
Global Cities, Incoherent Communities: Communication, Coexistence, and Conflict in Macau and Manila, 1550-1700

Christopher Gratien, Georgetown University
“The Mountains are Ours”: Settlement, Ecology, and the Late Ottoman Frontier, 1856-1956

Sarah Thompson Hines*, University of California, Berkeley
Water Rules: Urbanization and the Transformation of Cochabamba’s Waterscape, 1879-2000

Isabel Huacuja Alonso, University of Texas, Austin
Radio for the Millions: Hindi-Urdu Broadcasting at the Crossroads of Empire

Suzanne M. Kahn*, Columbia University
Divorce and the Politics of the American Social Welfare Regime, 1969-2001

Matthew Kruer*, University of Pennsylvania
The Susquehannock War: Native Americans, Bacon’s Rebellion, and the Forging of the Covenant Chain

Antoine Lentacker, Yale University
Signs and Substances: Publicity, Information, and Trust in the Drug Markets in France and Austria, 1880-1950

Brian Long*, University of Notre Dame
Towards the Cultural History of the Twelfth-Century Translation Movement

Maya Maskarinec, University of California, Los Angeles
Building Rome Saint by Saint: Sanctity from Abroad at Home in the City, Sixth-Ninth Century

James A. Palmer*, Washington University, St. Louis
Gold, Grain, and Grace: Piety and Community in Late Medieval Rome

Helen Pfeifer*, Princeton University
To Gather Together: Cultural Encounters in Sixteenth-Century Ottoman Literary Salons

James Robert Pickett, Princeton University
The Persianate Sphere during the Age of Empires: Islamic Scholars and Networks of Exchange in Central Asia, 1747-1917

Kristina Poznan, College of William and Mary
Becoming Immigrant Nation-Builders: The Development of Austria-Hungary’s National Projects in the United States, 1880s-1920s

Alicia Puglionesi, Johns Hopkins University
The Astonishment of Experience: Americans and Psychical Research, 1885-1935

Gregory Rosenthal*, State University of New York, Stony Brook
Hawaiians Who Left Hawai’i: Work, Body, and Environment in the Pacific World, 1786-1876

Elizabeth E. Searcy*, Brown University
Unconscious Mind in America, 1880-1917

Sarah Elizabeth Shortall, Harvard University
Soldiers of God in a Secular World: The Politics of Catholic Theology, 1905-1950

Brian A. Stauffer, University of Texas, Austin
Victory on Earth or in Heaven: Religion, Reform, and Rebellion in Michoacán, Mexico, 1869-1877

Edgar Curtis Taylor*, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Making Spatial and Historical Contexts: Racial Thought and Urban Life in Uganda, 1959-1972

Christy Thornton*, New York University
Sovereignty and Solidarity: The Mexican Revolution and the Origins of the Postwar Order, 1919-1948

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Digg thisShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on Tumblr

Back to Top

Leave a Reply

Comment

* Required field