What We’re Reading – May 28

AHA staff are eager consumers of great historical content, and we enjoy sharing our finds in our series What We’re Reading. Here are a few staff picks for articles published this week.

On ‘Generational’ Thinking

Against Generations
In her article in Slate, Rebecca Onion reflects on how non-historians periodize themselves and history (though they might not recognize the word “periodize”) by thinking in terms of generations. She argues that “generational thinking is seductive and confirms preconceived prejudices, but it’s a bogus way to understand the world.”

History in Jordan

A History of Women’s Activism in Jordan 1946-1989
Arab communists, student activists and social conservatism in the kingdom of Jordan were all effected by events in Palestine.

Young girl reading a book, Central Circulating Library at College and St. George Streets, Toronto, Ontario. CC BY 2.0, on Flickr.

Young girl reading a book, Central Circulating Library at College and St. George Streets, Toronto, Ontario. CC BY 2.0, on Flickr.

Developing Careers

If Students Are Smart, They’ll Major in What They Love
In her May 21, 2015, article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, AHA member Cecilia Gaposchkin advises undergraduates about the importance of choosing a major according to one’s enthusiasms. What is valuable to potential employers, she notes, “is not the content of the major, but rather the ability to think with and through that information.”

Incorporating History and the Humanities into International Business
A professor of international business discusses why an understanding of history is valuable when forming economic relations with other countries.

 

 

Fond Farewells

M-I-C-K-E-Y M-O-U-S-E
Claire Potter announces the end of her longtime blog, Tenured Radical, but says that although the blog itself may be retiring, Tenured Radical herself very much continues moving forward with new projects.

Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, leader of the Mexican forces in the Battle of the Alamo. But how will he translate to the screen?

Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, leader of the Mexican forces in the Battle of the Alamo. But how will he translate to the screen?

History on TV

Cable History
Controversy ensues after the University of Oklahoma history department and the History channel collaborate on an online American history course using video materials. University of Oklahoma faculty and AHA director Jim Grossman give their thoughts in this Inside Higher Ed article.

‘Texas Rising’: Alamo aftermath as remembered by History channel
This article discusses History’s miniseries, Texas Rising, which depicts the aftermath of the Alamo and the birth of the Texas Rangers.

Fun and Offbeat

The Fake History of the World
Opening on June 12, this art exhibit in Santa Monica, CA, features parodies of historical actors and events.

 

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