Author Archives: AHA

About AHA

The American Historical Association (AHA) is a nonprofit membership organization founded in 1884 and incorporated by Congress in 1889 for the promotion of historical studies. The AHA provides leadership for the profession, protects academic freedom, develops professional standards, aids in the pursuit and publication of scholarship, and supplies various services to sustain and enhance the work of its members. The association’s principal functions fall within four realms: publication, teaching, advocacy, and networking. As the largest historical society in the United States, the AHA serves historians representing every historical period and geographical area. The nearly 14,000 members include academics at universities, two- and four-year colleges, museums, historical organizations, libraries and archives, but also independent historians, students, K–12 teachers, government and business professionals, and countless people who, whatever their profession, possess an abiding interest in history.

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AHA Releases Statement

The American Historical Association issues the following statement regarding the recently released email correspondence of former Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels and his staff relating to the assignment of Howard Zinn’s work by an Indiana University faculty member.

Action Items by the AHA Council

Through email conversation, from February 20-May 15, 2013, the Council of the American Historical Association made the following decisions:

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What’s in the June AHR?

The June issue of the American Historical Review is now online, and will soon appear in member’s mailboxes. Below is an excerpt from AHR editor Robert A. Schneider’s In This Issue article:

The AHA Supports Russian Scholars

During its June 2 meeting, the AHA Council drafted the following statement in support of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies’ letter to Ambassador Sergey I. Kislyak:

Why Teach?

At a time when many people are wondering, “What jobs does a history degree prepare a student for?” almost everyone would agree that one such job is K–12 teaching. So this article from a Columbia history major who feels that