Author Archives: Debbie Doyle

About Debbie Doyle

Debbie Ann Doyle is the AHA’s coordinator of committees and meetings.

She works closely with the Program Committee and the Local Arrangements Committee. She often uses the blog to highlight events at the annual meeting and demystify the process of organizing the meeting and developing the program.

Debbie also writes about professional issues, based on her work with AHA committees exploring a range of issues across the discipline. She works with the Research Division, the Professional Division, the Committee on Women Historians, the Committee on Minority Historians, the Graduate and Early Career Committee, the Advisory Committee on Disability, and the LGBTQ Historians Task Force. She has also staffed task forces on public history and two-year and community college faculty. She is responsible for public history matters and often writes about issues in the field.

Debbie also posts occasionally to alert members of upcoming opportunities to apply for the Association’s book prizes, fellowships, and awards.

Debbie received her PhD in American history from American University in August 2003, a master’s degree from American University in 1993, and her BA in history from Clark University in 1990. Her dissertation explored the history of tourism and mass culture in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Her research interests include urban history, the history of tourism, gender history, and public history.

Nominations Invited for the American Historical Association’s Equity Awards

The American Historical Association seeks nominations for its Equity Awards, which recognize individuals and institutions that have demonstrated an exceptional record in recruiting and retaining students and new faculty from racial and ethnic groups underrepresented within the historical profession. Nominations

The National Parks and the Value of History

Heritage tourism is big business. A recent report on the economic impact of the National Park Service (NPS) estimates that 279 million visits to the parks in 2011 generated $30 billion in economic activity and supported 252,000 jobs, both in