Author Archives: Jennifer Reut

About Jennifer Reut

Jennifer Reut is the former associate editor of Perspectives on History.

Jennifer writes and edits news items and articles for the print and online versions of Perspectives on History and AHA Today. She writes primarily about events and news affecting museums, monuments, and archives; young academics and contingent faculty; the digital humanities; and members and affiliated societies.

Jennifer has taught and practiced in historic preservation and architectural history, with a particular focus on the post-World War II American landscape, for the last 10 years. She received her BA from Hampshire College and her MA and PhD in architectural history from the University of Virginia. Before returning to graduate school to study architectural history, she worked in publishing and interactive advertising in New York for 12 years. Jennifer counts the Society of Architectural Historians, the Vernacular Architecture Forum, and the Cultural Landscape Foundation among her favored professional affiliations outside the AHA.


GradPay Project Aims to Track Graduate Stipends

In the spirit of the Chronicle’s Adjunct Project, a new crowdsourced project to track graduate stipends called GradPay was recently launched by Joshua Carp, a doctoral student in psychology at University of Michigan.


Now Available—Edward L. Ayers on How Undergraduates See the Historical Profession

As we sat in the packed room at the 2013 annual meeting Plenary Session, “The Public Practice of History in and for a Digital Age,” sifting through the various conversational strands, our ears suddenly pricked up when we heard our name mentioned. Edward Ayers, president of the University of Richmond, was onstage, discussing his plans to bring Perspectives on History into his undergraduate classroom as a way of showing his students what historians do and discuss. We were intrigued: What would students think of Perspectives?

Ellen Harvey, Pillar-Builder Archive (installation view), 2013. Approximately 3,000 postcards, acrylic paint, and tape, dimensions variable. Photo courtesy Corcoran Gallery of Art.

Historians from Outer Space

Tourist season is winding down, but you’re in town and you decide to see what’s left of the big shows at the museums before they close for the fall installations.

Screen shot from Mukurtu mobile project.  The project is intended to assist public historians in their work, allowing them to collect, share, and build on the narratives from multiple publics. Features for communities include content creation and the ability to use native languages to create narratives with audio, video or text.

Building Digital Humanities Projects for Everyone

Earlier this summer, we profiled a few recipients of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ (NEH) Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants ( to see what kinds of projects were emerging from the world of DH with particular applications for historians.

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What I Do: Historians Talk about Their Work

So, you’re in graduate school, you’ve chosen history, but you realize the academy is not for you. You’d like to think about other careers, but you don’t know anyone with a history degree who works anywhere else.

2012–13 VAF President: Susan Kern (Coll. of William and Mary) investigates a structure near the hermitage at Point-Navarre. Photo by author.

The VAF at “Land’s End”: The Conference as Practice

It’s par for the course for conference attendees to arrive with a story of difficulty—flights missed, hotel reservations lost, WiFi dropped, and uncertain food—we’ve all experienced some or all of these troubles on our way to an annual gathering.


Digital History Abounds: A Roundup of Recent NEH Grant Projects

With the recent proliferation of the digital humanities (DH) in and outside the academy, we thought it might be useful to draw attention to the kinds of projects historians are developing. The National Endowment of the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities (NEH-ODH) has been an early and substantial supporter of projects and workshops across the DH community, so it made sense to look at the recent round of NEH-ODH grantees as a way of highlighting recent work by historians.