Author Archives: Seth Denbo

About Seth Denbo

Seth oversees the publication and membership departments of the AHA and is working to develop innovative digital projects to enhance the organization's mission.

Seth earned his PhD from the University of Warwick and is a cultural historian of eighteenth-century Britain. He has taught British history in universities in both the United States and the United Kingdom. He has also worked on digital projects at Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at UMD and the Department for Digital Humanities at King's College London. Over the past 10 years, Seth has participated actively in the development of innovative digital tools and methods for historical scholarship. Drawing on his experience as a teacher and researcher he played a key role in several international projects that expanded capacity for digital scholarship in the humanities. He also conceived and organized an ongoing seminar in digital history at the Institute of Historical Research in London that has been at the forefront of fostering innovation in the use of digital tools and methods for the study of history.

Googling History: The AHR Explores Implications of Using Digital Sources for Historians

The April issue of the American Historical Review inaugurates a new listing of digital primary sources. This feature serves as a preliminary guide to freely accessible online collections that will grow with each issue. We encourage readers to use this form to submit their own favorite digital primary-source archival collections for listing in future issues. As Lara Putnam argues in her article “The Transnational and the Text-Searchable: Digitized Sources and the Shadows They Cast” in the same issue, historians should be more aware of the implications of using these kinds of sources for the stories we tell about the past.

AHA Publishes Guidelines for Evaluation of Digital Scholarship

With greater numbers of historians making contributions to scholarship through digital means, the discipline must grow to encompass the variety of formats and media available in the rapidly evolving digital environment.

All History Is Local: Debating the Fate of a Confederate Soldier Statue in Maryland

My barber and I occasionally talk about Rockville past as he gives me my biweekly trim. It’s usually in the vein of “My mother remembered when Rockville had wooden sidewalks” or “I can remember when your neighborhood was open fields.” Last Saturday I started it by saying, “What do you think about this meeting on Monday about the Confederate soldier statue?” “Oh, I knew that would come up again,” he replied.

Draft Guidelines on the Evaluation of Digital Scholarship

Digital scholarship is having an impact on the discipline of history. Scholars give papers based on digital tools and methods at major conferences in the humanities. Many academics blog about their research and other issues related to the discipline