Annual Meeting

Preregistration and Housing Deadlines Approaching for AHA17!

Book Your Hotel
The deadline to reserve the AHA’s discounted conference hotel rooms is December 12. Rooms at the Sheraton Denver Downtown are still available, and attendees can use their Marriott rewards at this property.

Staying in the AHA’s housing block is a vital act of good citizenship. The AHA must fill a certain number of rooms to secure meeting space and other amenities, and fulfilling that obligation helps us offset some of the costs of organizing and holding the annual meeting.

December 9, 2016

Queer History for Troubling Times

By Nicholas L. Syrett

In the wake of the election of Donald Trump to the presidency, many queer people are fearful about losing the gains made in recent years in LGBT civil rights. Following the xenophobic and racist rhetoric emerging from his campaign, queer people of color, some of whom are undocumented or Muslim, are scared for what the future brings. At times like this, the work of queer historians is important in ensuring that the queer past is not erased altogether.

Name that Cocktail 2017!

Continuing a four-year AHA tradition, the Hyatt Regency Denver and Sheraton Denver Downtown will be offering signature cocktails at their bars during the 2017 AHA annual meeting. Now it’s up to you to help us give these cocktails historically relevant names! Meeting location and general historical practices are always good starting points. Previous years’ winners included: The Bourbon Restoration, The Return of the Martini Guerre, and Revise and Resubmit.

December 7, 2016

Historians of the Future: An Undergraduate at the Annual Meeting

By James Rick

While attending a panel on “the Culture Wars” in American history at the 2016 annual meeting of the American Historical Association in Atlanta, I was struck by something a fellow attendee said. As someone interested in cultural history, his comment, which concerned the influence of anthropological conceptions of culture on the way historians understand and employ the concept, felt important and worth wrestling with to me. I am now a graduate student, and this question, along with others that I encountered at the annual meeting, has stuck with me and often come up in the courses I am now taking.

Denver’s Asian Americans

By William Wei

An Asian American attorney contacted me recently to ask whether I knew that Denver once had a Chinatown. He expressed dismay that this historical fact was not widely known. There should be, at the very least, a sign to commemorate it, he said. It turns out he had called the right person—I did know that there was a Chinatown in Denver and I had even written articles about it.

November 17, 2016

The “Animal Turn” in History

By Dan Vandersommers

Over the past few years, the humanities have been confronting a paradigm shift.

After the cultural and linguistic turns of the 1970s and 1980s, ideas about language, meaning, representation, power, agency, othering, and knowledge-production redefined the humanities. Now, in 2016, new media, climate change, environmental catastrophe, terrorism, biotechnology, population growth, and globalization are destabilizing the core of the humanities. These forces are larger-than-human—they are seismic and are shifting intellectual terrain. They also require a change of perception—a new, less anthropocentric, vision for a new century.

Announcing the #AHA17 History Hashtag Drive!

Twitter is brewing with excitement these days in anticipation of the AHA’s 131st annual meeting! Already, enthusiastic presenters and attendees are tweeting about their sessions to the hashtag #aha17. (As with last year, please help spread the word that, since A-ha stole #aha2016, we’re now using the shortened version.)

Balancing Teaching and Scholarship: Why Two-Year Faculty Should Attend the AHA Annual Meeting

By Sarah Shurts

I am always surprised that so many of my colleagues at two-year colleges don’t go to the AHA annual meeting. They all have high regard for the AHA itself and for its publications such as the American Historical Review. Many are even AHA members. But for various reasons they don’t think about attending the meeting or submitting a proposal. Some say it is because of the cost associated with travel, particularly if they have other conferences to attend.