Graduate Education

Cultivating Mentoring Relationships in Grad School

By Sarah Mellors

Mentoring relationships in graduate school—be it a master’s or a doctoral program—are critical for success and yet are often difficult to navigate. While we’ve all heard horror stories about “bad” advisers, students have more agency than they realize. During my five years as a doctoral student at the University of California, Irvine, I’ve developed mentoring relationships that have not only enabled me to overcome myriad obstacles, but that will also guide me in the coming years as I transition into a faculty position.

Making Historians in the Archive

The blue books are all graded. If you’re in the coursework zone, your own assignments are in. The sun is out; green is returning to the land. Now, for most of us history grads, it’s time to spend a large portion of our summer in windowless rooms around the globe. Archive season is here! 

The Geography of History PhDs

The AHA’s “Where Historians Work” is an ambitious research project designed to track the career outcomes of everyone who earned a PhD in history from 2004–13 in the United States. Last year, we launched a beta version of “Where Historians Work” showing initial results from 34 PhD programs. Since then, we have gathered information on the remaining 127 PhD programs, locating some 8,000 individuals using publicly available information. We are now in a position to truly understand the national landscape of employment for history PhDs. 

The Gallery and the Gridiron: Learning about Career Diversity at an NFL Football Club

By Matthew Reeves

When I arrived at the headquarters of the Kansas City Chiefs Football Club it was like landing on another planet. Gone were the cinderblock walls, linoleum flooring, and flickering fluorescents of campus; in their place was a plush, tastefully designed working space shared by coaches, executives, and current players. It was nearly impossible not to be star struck by celebrity athletes, especially in a city that adores its local team. It was immediately clear to me, however, that I, like everyone else in the building, was there to work. 

Spring Cleaning Tip #1: Ditch the Meritocracy Myth

It’s early April, and many of us history grads are learning the outcomes of jobs, fellowships, and various other academic competitions we applied for. Sometimes the news is good, but more often, we open our inboxes to the dreaded “thank you for your interest . . .” e-mail. And even though the rejection notes try to soothe us with platitudes about the limited number of opportunities and the high number of applicants, it’s difficult to receive one of these e-mails and not believe that the rejections are indicative of our worth and the quality of our work. 

Letter to a Prospective History Graduate Student

Congratulations! Right about now, you are basking in the afterglow of acceptance(s) to graduate school. Maybe you’ve been invited for a campus visit or two. Now that you’ve made this commitment to become a graduate student, take a long moment to think carefully about what is being offered to you and what is being asked of you. What do you want from your MA or PhD in history? What can you do—from day one—to make the degree what you want it to be? 

The Graduate: Introducing a New Series on AHA Today

Welcome to the new AHA Today series on graduate life! The Graduate aims to provide a platform for students to discuss the issues they face, reflect on the unique experiences of pursuing a graduate degree in history (trials and triumphs alike), and make proposals for how we—as students, professionals, and as a discipline—can come together to address the challenges of graduate education. 

Thinking about Where Historians Work before Graduate School

Working at the American Historical Association for the past two years has made it impossible to shield myself from the uglier truths about pursuing a graduate degree in history—from the imbalance between the number of graduate degrees conferred and jobs available in the professoriate to the increasingly precarious nature of employment in higher education. Taken alone, these challenges might have convinced me (or any rational person) to run in the other direction. Instead, two years after getting my bachelor’s degree, I’m starting a history PhD program in the fall.