Scholarly Communication

When Historians Collaborate, Scholarship Benefits

By Christine Saidi, Catherine Cymone Fourshey, and Rhonda M. Gonzales

We are three historians who’ve collaborated in a variety of ways on several historical projects over the course of seven years. In the process, our intellectual work has taken turns we never envisioned. We hope that our discussions and approaches can push us all as historians to think about what collaboration looks like in our field, the expansive kind of work it can produce, and how we might infuse worth into undervalued aspects of collaboration. 

Hunting and Gathering: An Editor’s Life at the Annual Meeting

By Nancy Toff

On the first day of the AHA’s annual meeting, the most senior editors, the youngest marketing assistants, and anyone else representing a publisher are on their hands and knees in the Exhibit Hall unpacking skids full of books. We pray that all the boxes have arrived, and then we artfully arrange a display of the last year’s publishing efforts. In a few short hours, unruly stacks of cardboard boxes morph into a Potemkin Palace of history books. That Exhibit Hall is the best place on earth—and these days, often the only place—for scholars to actually peruse our new publications, especially the specialist monographs.

Some Mild Corrections: On the Press Coverage of the OAH and AHA Statements on Dissertations

On December 18 Inside Higher Ed (IHE) ran a story on the recent statement by the Organization of American Historians (OAH), which has joined the American Historical Association in recommending that universities give doctoral students the ability to opt out of online distribution of their dissertation for a reasonable period of time while they prepare their scholarship for print publication.