Tag Archives: AHA Roundtables

Interior of the U.S. Supreme Court, Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

AHA Roundtables on SCOTUS Decisions in Special Summer Online Issue of Perspectives on History

As we have often tried to demonstrate, we at the AHA believe that public discourse on any topic benefits from historical context and historical thinking. In that spirit, we’re rolling out a series of AHA Roundtables on two of the significant Supreme Court decisions handed down this summer. We have asked a group of historians to comment on these opinions, and we’ll be posting their responses over the next two weeks.

Interior of the U.S. Supreme Court, Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
 

First up is Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin.

Bar-Fight

AHA Roundtable: Historians’ Perspectives on

Web Ethics

How is the web, particularly social media properties like Twitter, changing the way scholars communicate and form connections with each other?” When I first started considering this question after the AHA annual meeting in New Orleans, I had been talking with bloggers and self-described “Twitterstorians” who had expressed concern over the lack of live-tweeting etiquette at conferences and meetings.

AHA Roundtable: The Presidential Debate of October 22, 2012

Last night’s debate began with a reference to the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.   My inner (or perhaps not so inner) AHA geek immediately jumped to recent efforts to make accessible to the public government documents relating to that event that are still classified.  But I also was drawn to recent reflections (here, and here) on whether flawed historical interpretations have yielded equally flawed policy lessons – conventional wisdoms that were on display once again last night.  It’s all about manhood and steely resolve, rather then the subtleties and occasional humility of collaboration and negotiation.

AHA Roundtable: The Presidential Debate of October 16, 2012

Anthony Grafton, president of the AHA in 2011, wrote in his inaugural column in Perspectives on History that “Historians of everything from drought in ancient Egypt to the economy of modern China do, in fact, have knowledge that matters—knowledge based on painstaking analysis of hard sources, which they convey to students and readers as clearly and passionately as can be managed.”

The Vice Presidential Debate of October 11, 2012: AHA Roundtable

Do Vice Presidential debates matter? That seemed to be the question of the day, the one that dominated the airwaves before and after last night’s debate. From our perspective as historians, we are certain that they do matter, even if they don’t generate a bump in the polls or a defining moment in the campaign. For the historian, they are responses to long-standing trends and further evidence of the importance of understanding the past.

AHA Roundtable: The Presidential Debate of October 3, 2012

As a community of historians the AHA believes that public discourse on any topic benefits from historical context and historical thinking. In that vein we have asked a group of historians to comment on last night’s presidential debate as historians. We leave the punditry to the pundits; the partisanship to the politicians.  Our role is to offer the benefit of historical thinking and historical context.