Tag Archives: SCOTUS

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What We’re Reading: June 27, 2013

Today’s What We’re Reading features the recent Supreme Court decisions, a new crowdsourcing project from the Chronicle aimed at tracking PhD placement, a new report on the health and vitality of national parks in England, and much more!

Interior of the U.S. Supreme Court, Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

AHA Roundtables on SCOTUS Decisions in Special Summer Online Issue of Perspectives on History

As we have often tried to demonstrate, we at the AHA believe that public discourse on any topic benefits from historical context and historical thinking. In that spirit, we’re rolling out a series of AHA Roundtables on two of the significant Supreme Court decisions handed down this summer. We have asked a group of historians to comment on these opinions, and we’ll be posting their responses over the next two weeks.

Interior of the U.S. Supreme Court, Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
 

First up is Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin.

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AHA Addresses Historical Issues in Supreme Court DOMA Case

The American Historical Association has joined a group of individual distinguished historians in signing an amicus brief in US v. Windsor, a case before the Supreme Court contesting the validity of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). As is so often the case in legal contexts, the details can get lost in the swirl of broader issues and we want to clarify some important aspects of the AHA’s decision.

AHA Roundtable: Historians’ Perspectives on the Supreme Court Health Care Ruling

In light of the historic importance of yesterday’s Supreme Court decision, and with the belief that history can help inform debate on any contemporary topic, we offer three commentaries from professors of history on yesterday’s ruling on the Affordable Care Act.

Alan Brinkley, Columbia University

Having prepared comments on the demise of the health care bill, I am happily surprised that the Court has sustained it. Over the months of waiting, I had thought that the only conservative justice who might support the bill would be Kennedy.