Tag Archives: Advocacy

What We’re Reading: September 16, 2010

In the news this week, historian William H. Goetzmann has passed away, the AHA has joined with a number of individuals and organizations to unseal Nixon Testimony, and the National Book Festival has released its schedule.  We also link to three videos this week, featuring James McPherson, the Library of Congress's collections, and "citizen archivists" at National Archives. Then, read about journalism and history, analog tools, the bygone tradition of pocket notebooks, and the flow of the Mississippi River. Finally, just for fun, hear alternatives to the RateMyProfessor.com site's "red-hot chili peppers," and check out a new game at EDSITEment. Article By: David Darlington, Elisabeth Grant, and Vernon Horn
September 16, 2010

Teaching American History Grants: A Call for Action

Recently, a number of AHA members and others have expressed concern and dismay over the future of the Teaching American History (TAH) grants, a program begun virtually single-handedly by Senator Robert C. Byrd in 2003. True, he was the program's devoted supporter who brooked no opposition in growing the program from an initial $50 million appropriation to the present approximately $120 million as a line item in the Department of Education's budget. Now that the senator is gone there are those, in the Obama Administration and elsewhere, who say that history must take second or third place to reading and mathematics, that in the midst of a the most severe recession in several generations the U.S. cannot afford the program, and, some even argue there is no evidence that the TAH program has made much of a difference, or that it has improved history teaching. Article By: Bruce Craig, former executive director of the National Coalition for History.

What We’re Reading: July 1, 2010 Edition

In the news this week, the Civil War Preservation Trust has sent a letter (with the support of 270 historians) asking Pennsylvania to reject a gaming resort near Gettysburg, Congress is meeting to discuss the National Historical Publications and Records Commission reauthorization bill, the National Science Foundation is seeking research proposals related to the Gulf oil spill, and the American Library Association rejects an IRB resolution. We also link to a number of interesting online resources this week: the new London Lives site and the Newberry Library's Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. For teachers, read about the rewriting of history books and the complexity of military history courses. We also take a look back at the history of Supreme Court nominations, the first Japanese tour group, video of Market Street in San Francisco before and after the 1905 quake, and a 112 year old sunken ship. Finally, explore an image from 1937, from photographer Eadweard Muybridge, and from the Korean War. Article By: Elisabeth Grant, Chris Hale, Arnita A. Jones, Robert B. Townsend, and Lee White

What We’re Reading: October 29, 2009 Edition

We start off this week with news and advocacy. Take a look at all the items in the National Humanities Alliance’s October Policy Digest as well as their push for NEH funding, review COSSA’s Washington Update, and in non-Washington related news, check out a map from 1675 up for auction in the UK.  Today, October 29th, is the anniversary of the “Black Tuesday” stock market crash, and we bring you three articles from NPR remembering the event. Have an iPhone? Check out a few apps for historians. And finally, with Halloween taking place this weekend we couldn’t resist brining you a couple of Halloween-related links. Article By: Miriam Hauss Cunningham, Elisabeth Grant, Arnita A. Jones, and Jessica Pritchard
October 29, 2009