Tag Archives: annual meeting series

Integrating Global Perspectives and World History into Teaching American History Grant Projects

National History Education ClearinghouseThis post is the sixth and final in a series of posts on sessions presented at the 123rd Annual Meeting. See also the introduction to this series, the first post on “Teaching and Learning through a Teaching American History Grant,” the second post on “A Historical Conundrum,” the third post on “Perspectives on Public History,” the fourth post on “Innovations in Collaboration,” and the fifth post on “The History Job Market.”

Similar to the panel on Teaching and Learning through a Teaching American History Grant, this panel explained ways a Teaching American History (TAH) grant could be expanded and applied to global history studies.

The History Job Market: Opportunities, Problems, and Fixes

graduate student sessionThis post is the fifth in a series of posts on sessions presented at the 123rd Annual Meeting. See also the introduction to this series, the first post on “Teaching and Learning through a Teaching American History Grant,” the second post on “A Historical Conundrum,” the third post on “Perspectives on Public History,” and the fourth post on “Innovations in Collaboration.”

This forum, headed by David Weber, explored the history job market, both past and present. Panelists studied statistics, surveyed PhD recipients, and offered advice to those hoping to enter the field.

Innovations in Collaboration: Building University-School Partnerships

Teaching session at the 123rd Annual MeetingThis post is the fourth in a series of posts on sessions presented at the 123rd Annual Meeting. See also the introduction to this series, the first post on “Teaching and Learning through a Teaching American History Grant,” the second post on “A Historical Conundrum,” and the third post on “Perspectives on Public History.”

One of the many challenges educators face in inspiring students to learn history is that it doesn’t typically top the favorite subject list for the average middle or high school student.

February 18, 2009

Perspectives on Public History: What Knowledge, Skills, and Experiences are Essential for the Public History Professional?

Public history sessionNote: This post is the third in a series of posts on sessions presented at the 123rd Annual Meeting. See also the introduction to this series, the first post on “Teaching and Learning through a Teaching American History Grant,” and the second post on “A Historical Conundrum.”

Although many who study history pursue academic careers, there are those who want to exercise their knowledge outside the academy. This dichotomy between public and academic historians can create somewhat of a rivalry between the two career tracks.

February 9, 2009

A Historical Conundrum: The Work of Historians Versus the Expectations of Secondary Education

National History Education ClearinghouseNote: This post is the second in a series of posts on sessions presented at the 123rd Annual Meeting. See also the introduction to this series, and the first post on “Teaching and Learning through a Teaching American History Grant”.

Though it may seem easy to blame the implementation of state regulated standardized tests on No Child Left Behind, frankly, secondary teachers have been grappling with teaching to selective curricula for decades. This panel discussed the challenges of teaching effectively while still preparing students for standardized tests.

February 2, 2009

Teaching and Learning through a Teaching American History Grant

Teaching and Learning at the 123rd Annual Meeting of the American Historical AssociationNote: This post is the first in a series of posts on sessions presented at the 123rd Annual Meeting. See also the introduction to this series.

The California State University at Fresno started a master’s program in 2005 through a Teaching American History Grant that seeks to strengthen the teaching skills of U. S. history teachers in the Fresno, California area. The program is designed “to demonstrate how school districts and institutions with expertise in American history can collaborate over a three-year period to ensure that teachers develop the knowledge and skills necessary to teach traditional American history in an exciting and engaging way.” A panel of four masters’ students, who were jokingly referred to as the guinea pigs of the program, discussed the pros and cons of the program and its applicability in helping them strengthen their teaching techniques.

January 26, 2009

History in the City: 2009 Annual Meeting Panels

This year’s annual AHA meeting offered numerous thought-provoking panels with some of the best and brightest minds in the discipline. In fact the weekend threw me into a sort of intellectual stimulation overload.

My background is English. My passion is history. However, it seems to me that much of the challenges historians face, English scholars face as well. Professional writers and public historians alike deal with the challenge of preparing themselves at a university level for non-academic careers. English teachers grapple with ways to make the discipline exciting and inspiring, just like history teachers who want to break the mold of reading, lecturing, and issuing tests.

January 26, 2009