Tag Archives: session of the week

Session of the Week: The Power of Cartography: Remapping the Black Death in the Age of Genomics and GIS

In an effort to highlight the diverse range of scholarship at the upcoming annual meeting, we’re highlighting different sessions here on the blog each week.

What caused the Black Death? This question has been the focus for scholars in both the humanities and microbiologist community for the past 30 years, and yet historians do not always actively engage with the work of their counterparts in the sciences. In response to emerging technology in the field of genetics/microbiology, a group of historians will convene at the annual meeting to discuss the topic of the Black Death (1346-1353) and current historiographical trends beyond the humanities.  The panel will discuss the topic from a global perspective, and reflect on current scholarship and emerging computer technology for data analysis and information gathering now being used by microbiologists.

Session of the Week: The Deep History of Africa: New Narrative Approaches

In an effort to highlight the diverse range of scholarship at the upcoming annual meeting, we’re highlighting different sessions on the blog each week.

Representing a multi-disciplinary approach to history, a panel of linguists, archeologists and historians will convene at the annual meeting to caste new light on existing narratives in early African history. Scholars in this panel will investigate new methodological approaches to African history, including the use of emerging topography and mapping technology, documentary film, and multi-media websites.

The Deep History of Africa: New Narrative Approaches
(AHA Session 200)

Date: Saturday, January 5, 2013: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM
Location: Oak Alley Room (Sheraton New Orleans)
Chair: James H.

Session of the Week: Foods from Places, Foods with Stories: A Roundtable on the State of the Field of Food History

In an effort to highlight the diverse range of scholarship at the upcoming annual meeting, we’re featuring different sessions on the blog each week.

Foodways is one of the fastest growing genres of history in the last few years. Participants in this session will examine the ways in which cuisine reflects concepts of nationalism, the construction of early modern commodity chains in the Atlantic World, and diaspora.

Foods from Places, Foods with Stories: A Roundtable on the State of the Field of Food History
(AHA Session 219)

Date: Saturday, January 5, 2013: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM
Location: Roosevelt Ballroom II (Roosevelt New Orleans)
Chair: Jeffrey M.

Session of the Week: Climate Change and Big History: From the Origin of Modern Humanity to the Little Ice Age

In an effort to highlight the diverse range of scholarship at the upcoming annual meeting, we’re highlighting different sessions on the blog each week.

Senior historians collaborate with the scientific community to discuss the long term effects of climate change on the human condition. Topics to be explored in this session include: migration, periodization and the rise of the nation state.

Climate Change and Big History: From the Origin of Modern Humanity to the Little Ice Age
(AHA Session 140)

Date: Saturday, January 5, 2013, 9:00 a.m.- 11:00 a.m.

Session of the Week: The Emancipation Proclamation at 150: Dynamics, Contexts, and Legacies

In an effort to highlight the diverse range of scholarship at the upcoming annual meeting, we’re highlighting different sessions here on the blog each week.

September 22, 2012 marked the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. For the annual meeting, a group of prominent historians have come together to discuss the legacy of the act, including: local dynamics, a transnational view of abolition in the world, and transitions to freedom in the Americas.

The Emancipation Proclamation at 150: Dynamics, Contexts, and Legacies
(AHA Session 30)
Date: Thursday, January 3, 2012, 3:30p.m.-5:30 p.m.

Session of the Week: Valuing the Environment

Participants in session 188, Valuing the Environment, look to nature and environmentalism in different nations from the 19th century through the present.

Karl Jacoby explores the North America in the 19th century and how “nature was essential to creating the new human community of the nation.” Jane Carruthers looks to Southern Africa in the 1800s through 2000 through the lens of elephant hunting. And finally, Peter C. Perdue presents “recent Asian environmental history, including the history of tea and fish.”

Valuing the Environment
AHA Session 188
Saturday, January 8, 2011: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM
Room 207 (Hynes Convention Center)

Chair: Harriet Ritvo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Papers: Home/Land: Grounding the Nation State
Karl Jacoby, Brown University

Giants in the Landscape: Elephants, Environmentalism, and Wildlife History in Southern Africa, 1800–2000
Jane Carruthers, University of South Africa

Asian Environmental History: The Transnational Perspective
Peter C.

December 27, 2010

Session of the Week: The Borders of Immigration History

In session 67, The Borders of Immigration History: Citizenship and Politics from the Local to the Global, the presenters examine immigration through three different lenses: immigration in the Reconstruction years; Japanese, Chinese, and Mexican American experiences from 1945 to 1965; and Los Angeles’s Koreatown from 1965 to 1992.

First up Hidetaka Hirota (Boston Coll.) looks to state-level immigration control in the 1870s (primarily in Massachusetts and New York), notes undesirable classes of European immigrants, and explains the lesser known Immigration Act of 1882.

December 13, 2010