Tag Archives: web ethics

WWR_5.30_books

What We’re Reading: May 30, 2013

Today’s What We’re Reading features a modern history of swearing, a course in online civility, one blogger’s thoughts on eliminating the survey course, summer reading options, and much more.

History in the News
The Modern History of Swearing: Where All the Dirtiest Words Come From
Salon excerpts some of the interesting etymologies of some of our most colorful nouns, verbs, and adjectives.

The German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

The GHI has released information on its annual spring lecture series, on the topic of public debt—a timely topic, in light of austerity and debates over US federal government debt.

Bar-Fight

AHA Roundtable: Historians’ Perspectives on

Web Ethics

How is the web, particularly social media properties like Twitter, changing the way scholars communicate and form connections with each other? When I first started considering this question after the AHA annual meeting in New Orleans, I had been talking with bloggers and self-described “Twitterstorians” who had expressed concern over the lack of live-tweeting etiquette at conferences and meetings. Intrigued, we responded by crowdsourcing a “Dos and Don’ts of Live-Tweeting” list,  but quickly realized that we needed to have a much broader conversation about ethical web practices and the future web environment for scholars.

Wild-west_Tweeting

The Dos and Don’ts of Live-Tweeting at an Academic Conference: An Update

A few weeks ago, I asked our readers to help me tackle an issue raised at the annual meeting—the lack of etiquette for live-tweeting. The response to our working draft was overwhelming, but also intriguing (you can read the conversation in totality here). Many of the topics raised by readers intersect with our own Statement on Standards of Professional Conduct, including issues of privacy, attribution, and professional conduct.

Live-Tweeting

The Dos and Don’ts of Live-Tweeting at an Academic Conference: A Working Draft

Live-tweeting at conferences is growing in popularity, but should there be limits? While at the annual meeting this year, I had the opportunity to talk with bloggers and self-described “Twitterstorians” who expressed concern over the lack of live-tweeting etiquette. Not sure what live-tweeting is or why historians are concerned? Here is a quick rundown of the issue:

February 12, 2013